• Marketing strategy & planning

    Developing and delivering marketing plans which create Return On Investment

  • Stunning Websites

    Design & build of websites that create business

  • Getting found online

    Increasing awareness and driving traffic to your website

  • Branding

    Logo design, rebranding, corporate identity

1
/
3
/

We Are

Digital Glue – marketing, design & web agency
Grabbing attention – online, in print & in person

Services

Branding

Branding

Digital Glue make sure your branding and logo design fits for all mediums: print, online, social media, and anywhere else.
learn more

Copywriting

Copywriting

By understanding customers, Digital Glue create content for our clients which gets their customers taking action.
learn more

Email Marketing

Email Marketing

Email marketing is a cost effective and relevant way of reaching your customers, contacts and prospects. Digital Glue help our clients reach more of them. learn more

Marketing Strategy

Marketing Strategy

Digital Glue help our clients to create clear marketing plans in a number of ways, resulting in improved business.
learn more

Public Relations (PR)

Public Relations (PR)

Digital Glue’s Public Relations clients benefit from an integrated approach; combining old-fashioned basics with a modern approach.
learn more

Print Design

Print Design

Digital Glue’s clients benefit from our team of creative thinkers who together produce professional print and digital designs for effective communication.
learn more

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

Our SEO services are designed to make sure that we make your website relevant for the people who want information or to buy from your site.
learn more

Social Media Management

Social Media Management

Digital Glue help our clients communicate effectively with their audiences through our social media management.
learn more

Web Design

Web Design

Digital Glue help our clients create websites which present their business in the best possible way and drive their customers to take action.
learn more

Our Work

Landlock® 

Print Design
 0

Falanx

Website
 0

Castel Froma

Design & Branding / Marketing / Website
 0

Canny Bites

Copywriting / Design & Branding
 3

Macphun Luminar

Copywriting / PR
 2

Learning to Shape Birmingham

Design & Branding / Print Design / Website
 2

Like what you see?  View our portfolio

Our Work

From the Blog

5 things we learnt about marketing messages at SL/CED

19th September 2018
You might have noticed that we recently hosted a marketing seminar called SL/CED. Our SL/CED events are a series of seminars designed to give marketing advice in small, easy to digest chunks. We’ve previously ran events on social media and video marketing but this quarter, we focused on how to create marketing messages which generate leads. During the seminar we had presentations from our marketing experts – MD, Javan Bramhall and Creative Director, Ben King. We also teamed up with brand strategy expert and founder of Go Bookey, Richard Bookey, who has fourteen years’ experience building famous brands, and has worked with clients such as Unilever, Diageo and Samsung. Along with a plethora of tips from our marketing gurus we treated our guests to a free breakfast! If you couldn’t make it to our event, don’t worry – we’ve rounded up some key takeaways to help you start tailoring your marketing messages to your ideal customers, and win more business. 1. Understand your objectives for your marketing campaigns Do you know what the definition of a successful marketing campaign is? It’s simple, if you have achieved the objectives you set out for the campaign, then your campaign has been a success. The best marketing campaigns are always focussed, specific and segmented. Sounds straightforward, but the reality is that so many businesses try to target everyone, using the exact same messaging. However, people don’t have the same needs, challenges or interests, so why should the marketing messages be the same? Here’s something really important to remember: “By communicating with everyone, you end up not communicating with anyone” 2. Identify your Ideal Customer “An Ideal Customer is someone who finds the perfect solution to their problems or needs in the services or products that your company provides.” That statement is a great definition of who an ideal client is, but we can dig deeper. An Ideal Customer is: Someone you can help with your product or service Someone with the right fit – your brand/product/service must be aligned with the customer, or it won’t resonate with them Someone in the right location – if you only want to sell to people in the UK, make sure your marketing is targeted to that area Someone who has the budget – if you can’t provide a product or service at a price that suits a customer, you will end up delivering a sub-standard product The right buying process – is it long term or short term cycles? If you want more detail on how you define your Ideal Customer, we’ve written more about it in our previous blog. Why should I care about my Ideal Customer? In order to create messaging which encourages someone to take an action, you need to understand the people you’re communicating with and what motivates them. The better understanding we have, the better our ability to communicate with them in a way that means they will take action. Once we understand what challenges our ideal customer has, and what issues

How do you define your ideal customer?

12th September 2018
In our upcoming SL/CED seminar we will be exploring how to create marketing messages which generate leads for a business. A big part of generating quality leads comes from understanding who you are targeting – your ideal customer. Once you know that, you can tailor your marketing messaging specifically to them, instead of trying to be all things to all people. Targeting your ideal customer – where to start   An impressive marketing plan is useless if you are not delivering it to the right people. For example, you wouldn’t aim a marketing campaign for a new beer at primary school children; it would be pointless, and kind of illegal. Businesses waste time looking in the wrong places for potential customers, but you can nail down your ideal customer with these simple steps. Make sure you’re clear about what you’re marketing You might think you know your business and its products and services inside-out, but would a customer? Brainstorm the benefits of the products and services your marketing will focus on. What problems do they solve, and what sort of person/business needs these problems solving? Remember to stay customer focussed. Look at it from their perspective. A great example is technology. You could have the greatest bit of tech available but it you can’t distil the customer benefit, you won’t sell any. Start with your existing customers… Your existing customers and clients aren’t just valuable because of their loyalty, but can actually be a great indication for how your business should be moving forward. Think about the sort of people they are. What defining interests and characteristics do they have in common? Conducting some market research in the form of a quick survey with your customers can reveal useful information to help you define your target market. …then focus on new customers Once you’re more familiar with your current type of customer and are happy you fully understand the problems your products and services can solve, you should have a better understanding of the people you should be aiming your marketing campaigns at. Who? Look at key demographics such as age, gender, location, and income level, for example. Paint a picture of the type of an ideal customer that will gain from your products/services. What? Think about what interests and hobbies this type of customer have, and how what you’re offering can fit into their lifestyles. Why? Why do they need your product? Consider what problem it will solve for them. Where? Where do your does your ideal customer look for their information? For example, teenagers are likely to look in different places than a professional audience. Consider which platforms you need to utilise to reach your target audience. A Digital Glue example We previously worked on a social media strategy for a client, and the first task we set ourselves was defining the target audience. In this case, we needed to break the target audience down into three different groups and then develop social marketing ideas for each, focussing on which social

Clickbait: how can we use it (well) in marketing?

6th September 2018
Clickbait, noun, informal, (on the Internet) content whose main purpose is to attract attention and encourage visitors to click on a link to a particular web page We’ve all been there – innocently browsing the web and before you know it, 4 hours has passed and you’ve ended up down a deep, dark internet hole, reading about the truth behind how green gummy bears will destroy the world. Clickbait is everywhere, and even though we recognise the tactics used, we still feel compelled to click. It’s a very clever (and cheap) tactic – it tickles our innate desire for curiosity through images or titles to ‘bait’ us into wanting to find out more by shocking or surprising us, leaving us on a cliff-hanger desperate to know just HOW different the cast of the Goonies look now.  How can we use clickbait (well) in marketing? When done well, clickbait headlines will make people stop and give you their most important asset – their attention. So, how can you use some of these tactics to aid your marketing without selling your soul to the clickbait devil? Headlines  A good headline doesn’t just get clicks – it gets the right clicks. Creating engaging, interesting headlines that incites interest from a reader is great – and can also do great things for SEO –  but duping them into something that is misleading and irrelevant is bad marketing. Your content must deliver on your headline’s promise, not just put a good spin on a mundane topic. And on the flipside, if your headline doesn’t do a good job at representing your content, no one will ever know how good your content is. Social analytics company BuzzSumo analysed 100 million headlines to identify the most common phrases that resulted in the most social engagement. Typical headlines included: 24 Pictures That Will Make You Feel Better About The World What This Airline Did for Its Passengers Will Make You Tear Up 6 Harsh Truths That Will Make You a Better Person These headlines set out why the reader should care about the content and highlight that it will evoke a particular feeling. Whilst this seems to work, over-sensationalising stories can be a real turn-off. Instead, ensure your headlines are benefits-led and punchy – try to condense the key benefits that your content will have for the reader so they instantly know what’s on offer. Lists and numbers This is something Buzzfeed absolutely revel in. Who doesn’t want to read an article that lists 76 cats that are having a worse week than you? Using lists to break up and pick out the key takeaways from content such as blogs, can be hugely beneficial. Visually, this content is different – when reading a list we either scan through or naturally stop to pause on nuggets of information. Lists therefore, are perfectly designed to meet our needs in today’s environment – quick, punchy information that doesn’t require too much commitment. This also acts as a good way-in for longer, more detailed content that can follow. You’ll

A guide to running a successful product launch

29th August 2018
When you’re launching a new product, you want to get immediate traction in your chosen target markets. A strong PR product launch plan is a great place to start – getting your product quickly communicated to large sections of your target audience through online and print news channels, bloggers and vloggers and influencers is a great start. Managed well, getting your product reviewed almost immediately after launch, so people have confidence in purchasing the product is also possible. For the purposes of this blog, we’re going to assume that you’ve defined the target audiences for your product, and which markets are the key priority. Getting the basics in place for your product launch First things first, you need to make sure you’ve got your messaging right for the new product. It’s crucial that you’re clear on: What’s new? What does the product do which your previous product didn’t and that’s new in the market? It’s important to think in terms of what it does for your customers. If you want to highlight a new piece of technology or innovation that your proud of, that’s absolutely fine, but it needs to be in the context of customer benefits. What are the Benefits? Having clear detail on exactly what the product does and how it helps the customer is vital. Market comparison It can be very helpful to understand where your product sits in terms of features and benefits against your competition, and existing products in your portfolio. This doesn’t have to made into a public facing document, but it’s great for internal use if nothing else, and if you’re willing and confident in publishing it, it can be a great way to showcase a step forward against your competition. The offer Will you be offering a promotion on the new product? Or if not, will you be offering a way for existing customers to get the new product and benefit from their brand loyalty? Being clear on this before the product launch is crucial because it’s a question you’re going to get asked. Speaking of which… FAQs Spending the time to think of the questions customers (and press) are going to ask about your products is well worthwhile. A web page can help team members and customers quickly get the information they need. Product Photography/Videography If you’re launching a product, you’re going to need good photography and likely video collateral for all manner of reasons, but none more so than high and low-res photography that the press can use of your product. Having this included with fact sheets, FAQs, pricing and offers, product comparison and your product launch press release in a press pack, is an easy way to ensure that you consistently provide press with the right information. Getting maximum coverage from your product launch So, you’ve got your ducks in a row, and you’re ready to launch your product, what’s the best approach? Briefing & heads up First up, it’s worth identifying key/known journalists and contacts who you are