• Marketing strategy & planning

    Developing and delivering marketing plans which create Return On Investment

  • Stunning Websites

    Design & build of websites that create business

  • Getting found online

    Increasing awareness and driving traffic to your website

  • Branding

    Logo design, rebranding, corporate identity

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We Are

Digital Glue – marketing, design & web agency
Grabbing attention – online, in print & in person

12 Key Steps to Successful Email Marketing

Services

Branding

Branding

Digital Glue make sure your branding and logo design fits for all mediums: print, online, social media, and anywhere else.
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Copywriting

Copywriting

By understanding customers, Digital Glue create content for our clients which gets their customers taking action.
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Email Marketing

Email Marketing

Email marketing is a cost effective and relevant way of reaching your customers, contacts and prospects. Digital Glue help our clients reach more of them. learn more

Marketing Strategy

Marketing Strategy

Digital Glue help our clients to create clear marketing plans in a number of ways, resulting in improved business.
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Public Relations (PR)

Public Relations (PR)

Digital Glue’s Public Relations clients benefit from an integrated approach; combining old-fashioned basics with a modern approach.
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Print Design

Print Design

Digital Glue’s clients benefit from our team of creative thinkers who together produce professional print and digital designs for effective communication.
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Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

Our SEO services are designed to make sure that we make your website relevant for the people who want information or to buy from your site.
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Social Media Management

Social Media Management

Digital Glue help our clients communicate effectively with their audiences through our social media management.
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Web Design

Web Design

Digital Glue help our clients create websites which present their business in the best possible way and drive their customers to take action.
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Our Work

Macphun Luminar

Copywriting / PR
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Learning to Shape Birmingham

Design & Branding / Print Design / Website
 2

The Lease Guide

Design & Branding / Website
 1

X-Rite Video ColorChecker

Marketing / PR
 1

Like what you see?  View our portfolio

From the Blog

Our top 6 Marketing and PR campaigns of 2017 so far

23rd June 2017
We’re halfway through 2017 already, and there’s been a whole host of really interesting Marketing and PR campaigns – both good and bad – that have intrigued and inspired us when we’ve been working with our own clients. So we thought we’d count down our top six PR campaigns of 2017 so far and explain exactly why they were so great. Digital Glue’s top 6 Marketing and PR campaigns of 2017 so far   January Pranks are all the rage on social media, so what better way of grabbing people’s attention than scaring them silly? That’s just what the brains behind the new sequel to The Ring did back in January when customers looking to buy a new TV were met with a real life horror movie. The makers of this stunt were also behind a similarly spooky prank for the 2013 remake of Carrie which saw members of the public get more than they bargained for when they went to buy a coffee – you can watch the video below.   February As an office of foodies, this one certainly caught our attention! In a bid to get Brits “in the mood for romance”, February saw supermarket Morrisons selling Oysters for the discounted price of just 25p each – the same price as a Freddo! Given that the average retail price of a single oyster is £1.59, that’s a pretty big bargain, and one that the press loved!   March Greta spotted this piece of brilliance and shared it round the team back in March – and we’re still thinking about it! To raise awareness for World Water Day on March 22nd, and to highlight the poor water conditions many around the world suffer, One Water created ‘dirty’ bottles. The effect was created by giving normal water bottles a brown colouring, and the campaign was picked up by several media giants, including The Huffington Post and The Metro. April April saw the London Games Festival take place, and it was a pretty big deal. And by big, we mean big. To celebrate the festival, a giant Monopoly board was installed in Trafalgar Square – complete with dice and counters –  which featured significant events in video gaming, which the public could play on. Michael French, director, London Games Festival said that the board game was created to “highlight the launch of London Games Festival in a visually fun and interactive way”. We love the simplicity of updating a classic and instantly recognisable game to draw audiences in – it’s a much more creative idea than sticking up a VR pop up stand! May May saw loads of brilliant PR campaigns take place – from Topshop’s virtual waterslide down Oxford Street, to Ladbroke’s survey announcing that Britain should leave Eurovision as a result of Brexit. The campaign on everyone’s lips however was, of course, Nike’s Breaking2 campaign, the brand’s attempt to make history by breaking the sub-two-hour marathon barrier. They invested millions in training some of the best long distance runners (Eliud

The real winner of #GE2017 was social media

16th June 2017
This time last week, Britain were yet again attempting to come to terms with a surprising voting outcome, and it’s safe to say we’re still all a bit baffled. One thing I think we can at least make some sense of is how we arrived at this outcome – is it actually that surprising? On the surface, yes it is. Theresa May called a snap election because she, and many others, believed she was untouchable. A landslide victory was predicted. Yet as a 24 year-old with my head regularly in social media, Corbyn’s success came as less of a shock. Twitter loved him. And not just my Twitter ‘bubble’. Celebrities, that by their own admittance had never voted or taken the slightest bit of interest in politics, loved him – he even had the backing of Danny Devito. Theresa May, on the other hand, had the more traditional backing of a large share of the press – most notably, The Daily Mail and The Sun. In previous elections, backing from of one of these papers basically guaranteed you victory. So why not this time? Taking a look at the papers’ demographics is telling. The Media Briefing found that in 2014, a huge 63% of the Daily Mail’s readership were over 55, whilst a mere 14% were under 34. The Sun’s audience were somewhat younger – 36% fell into the over 55 bracket and they boasted 29% in the under 34 section. The latest stats from Newsworks show a shift. Only 11.9% of Daily Mail readers are now under 34, whilst the over 55 demographic has significantly grown to 70.8%. The Sun shares a similar story. Whilst their audience is still younger, the under 34 demographic has dropped to 24%, and the over 55 demographic has increased to 43.6%.   Over-55s still vote – in fact, they’re more likely to than anyone – so why did the campaigns led by the press fail? A decline in millennial readership teamed with the ever-growing rise of social media meant traditional print press lost this round. Millennials don’t get their news from newspapers, they get it from Twitter. Whilst our grandparents read ‘the latest’ in their morning paper, we were over it 12 hours ago. The Conservative Party knew this. And they rightly assumed that their voters would be the over-55s who read the papers that praised May and attacked Corbyn. What they didn’t count on was the notoriously-crap-at-voting under-25s becoming politically engaged. Here’s how it unfolded. Register to vote…or don’t The Labour Party’s campaign kickstarted by urging people to register to vote – namely people in that 18-25 bracket. Tweets, Facebook posts and Snapchats encouraging people to register to vote before 22nd May came from both Corbyn’s and Labour’s accounts. A study by the Press Association found that in the week leading up to the cut-of date, Labour were by far the most active party in encouraging social media users to register, and did so in more than a third (36%) of their

How to create a website which engages and converts

9th June 2017
Despite the typical British Summertime weather and small matter of voting, on June 8th, a variety of interesting people from businesses around the Midlands made the trip to The Bond to join us for our second Digital Glue seminar. The seminar focused on creating websites which engage and convert, an essential topic for nearly every business in the modern world. If you couldn’t make it, here’s a snippet of what you missed. Engagement through design Our seminar kicked off with Ben King, Creative Director at Digital Glue, talking about achieving engagement through design. Ben leads on our web design projects, shaping the user experience and ensuring that the creative fits in with the brief and audience, so has plenty of knowledge to share. Ben’s top 5 tips Strong web design equals strong consumer trust. Badly designed websites are often not read, trusted or visited – 94% of the reasons a user rejects a site is for design related issues, while only 6% is for content-related issues. Do your best to avoid popups – they only annoy and frustrate the user. Ensure navigation is distinct and consistent throughout the site to make it easier for the user. Menu order and size matters! Try and keep your menu under 7 items, and put the most important items at the beginning and end. Mobile responsiveness is essential in today’s world. With far less screen space available on mobiles, it is important to use the space you do have wisely. Use a burger menu to tuck the menu away when not needed so you can focus on key messaging and call-to-actions. The homepage of a professional looking website has a clearly defined menu and navigation, captivating photo(s), and a compelling call to action. Your website has about 5 seconds to make an impression – make sure it’s the right one. The right imagery for the right audience The second part of the seminar was delivered by James Crockford from Associated Images. James is Digital Glue’s photographer of choice for almost all our web design projects. Not only does he take great photographs, he also understands the client and what images are being used for, creating images which stand out and capture the personality of the business. James’ top 5 tips There is no right and wrong image. An image is only right if it is right for your audience. When choosing imagery for your website, think about how you’re trying to make the audience feel and how you want to convey your business. Really understand your brand. How will you know if you’ve picked the right image for the right audience if you don’t know what you’re trying to convey? Consider different imagery options; you may want to commission a photographer, use stock photos, or take your own snaps on your phone. Your decision should always be based on what’s right for your audience, and all are legitimate choices. If you use a photographer, brief them properly. Be clear on what your business does,

SEO No-No’s: 5 things you didn’t know affected your Google ranking

26th May 2017
As we all should know by now, there are three main SEO factors that will positively affect your Google ranking. These are: Unique, good quality content Relevant and well used keywords High quality inbound and outbound links But what about those things that negatively impact your Google ranking? Many businesses are following poor SEO practice without even realising it. Luckily, it’s easy to identify these problems and correct them. Here are our top 5 SEO no-no’s that are probably affecting your Google ranking.   Slow loading speed Did you know that if your website isn’t optimised for mobile, Google will penalise you? If your page is too slow to load on mobile, or blocks CSS, JavaScript, or images, you’re hindering your chances of ranking. Mobile responsive web design is one factor that will help your website rank in searches. Plus, providing a good user experience will keep visitors on your website for longer!   Pop ups As of January 2017, Google also started to penalise websites with annoying pop ups. In their official statement, Google said, “pages that show intrusive interstitials (pop ups) provide a poorer experience to users than other pages where content is immediately accessible. This can be problematic on mobile devices where screens are often smaller.” Google are entirely focussed on the user when it comes to what they consider worthy of ranking on the first page of a search, and they’re not wrong to be, either – I think we can all sympathise with the feeling of having fingers that are too fat to click the ‘X’ button! The best thing to do to get round this is to prompt your audience to take action through providing quality content and a compelling call to action, rather than twisting their arm with an intrusive pop up. Duplicate content If there’s one simple rule to follow when it comes to good SEO practice, it’s be unique. Remember, there are two types of duplicate content – the type that happens on one domain and the type that happens across multiple domains. The first might include product descriptions that appear on different pages, for example, while the second is identical content from different sources. Why is it an issue? In a nutshell, if Google already has something in its index, there’s no incentive for them to index another web page that is essentially the same. Users can get this information elsewhere. However, duplicate content is a little bit trickier than you might think. It happens for multiple reasons, such as how URL parameters or Session IDs replicate a URL.  For a closer look at how duplicate content is created and how it can be avoided, we recommend you check out this post by Moz.   Bad links Earlier this year, Google Quality Senior Strategist Andrey Lipattsev confirmed that content and links are the two most important ranking factors for Google. The quality of the links you use and the websites that link to you are becoming an increasingly important factor in