• Marketing strategy & planning

    Developing and delivering marketing plans which create Return On Investment

  • Stunning Websites

    Design & build of websites that create business

  • Getting found online

    Increasing awareness and driving traffic to your website

  • Branding

    Logo design, rebranding, corporate identity

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We Are

Digital Glue – marketing, design & web agency
Grabbing attention – online, in print & in person

12 Key Steps to Successful Email Marketing

Services

Branding

Branding

Digital Glue make sure your branding and logo design fits for all mediums: print, online, social media, and anywhere else.
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Copywriting

Copywriting

By understanding customers, Digital Glue create content for our clients which gets their customers taking action.
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Email Marketing

Email Marketing

Email marketing is a cost effective and relevant way of reaching your customers, contacts and prospects. Digital Glue help our clients reach more of them. learn more

Marketing Strategy

Marketing Strategy

Digital Glue help our clients to create clear marketing plans in a number of ways, resulting in improved business.
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Public Relations (PR)

Public Relations (PR)

Digital Glue’s Public Relations clients benefit from an integrated approach; combining old-fashioned basics with a modern approach.
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Print Design

Print Design

Digital Glue’s clients benefit from our team of creative thinkers who together produce professional print and digital designs for effective communication.
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Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

Our SEO services are designed to make sure that we make your website relevant for the people who want information or to buy from your site.
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Social Media Management

Social Media Management

Digital Glue help our clients communicate effectively with their audiences through our social media management.
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Web Design

Web Design

Digital Glue help our clients create websites which present their business in the best possible way and drive their customers to take action.
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Our Work

Canny Bites

Copywriting / Design & Branding
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Macphun Luminar

Copywriting / PR
 2

Learning to Shape Birmingham

Design & Branding / Print Design / Website
 2

The Lease Guide

Design & Branding / Website
 1

X-Rite Video ColorChecker

Marketing / PR
 1

Like what you see?  View our portfolio

From the Blog

5 things we learnt about social media success at Social Media: SL/CED

8th November 2017
You might have seen (and if you haven’t, where have you been?) that we recently hosted Social Media: SL/CED, the latest in our SL/CED series of seminars, designed to give marketing advice in small, easy to digest chunks. This time, we teamed up with the founder and editor of the fabulous newsletter I Choose Birmingham, Tom Cullen, to let the people of Birmingham into the secrets of social media success – as well as treating them to a free breakfast! If you couldn’t make it down for the real thing, then fear not – we’ve rounded up our top 5 takeaways so that you too can smash your social media marketing! Do less, but do it well One of the first lessons of the day can be summed up in a couple of words that our Managing Director, Javan, said – “do less, and do it well”. Some businesses feel  the need to create a presence on every single social media platform possible to achieve social media success, but this isn’t the right approach for the majority of business. One of the most important things to nail when it comes to your social media marketing is getting the platform right – find out where your audience mostly are, figure out how best to leverage your message, and hit that platform with a well-thought out, super focussed strategy. How you say things is important, but remember what you say Tom shared an anecdote about his own experiences with I Choose Birmingham which we thought was really powerful. If you’re local to the area, you may know about the recent bin-strikes in Birmingham. Tom talked about how I Choose – in line with their usual sardonic style – became known for providing a bit of light relief for Brummies during the period where their bins weren’t being collected. Bin strike, day 83,832 pic.twitter.com/qngLOpEvSY — I Choose Birmingham (@ichoosemag) August 16, 2017 Thought I'd had an incredible business idea: charge people for me to take their rubbish away! Then I realised I just invented Council tax — I Choose Birmingham (@ichoosemag) July 28, 2017 Seriously though, who are the big winners of the bin strike? — I Choose Birmingham (@ichoosemag) September 22, 2017 However, one post shared by I Choose Birmingham missed the mark and received a bit of a backlash: New idea: We all go on strike until the bin men agree to come off strike. So, whatever it is you do for a living, stop doing it immediately. — I Choose Birmingham (@ichoosemag) July 18, 2017 Tom talked about how at the time he thought of the tweet as a bit of funny, engaging content, but when the backlash began, he’d realised his mistake: he’d forgotten his audience. Of course, a group of liberal, metropolitan young people might take offence to the suggestion that bin men are slacking off by striking. Moral of the story? Remember not to forget your audience and your shared values while chasing quality content, humour, a

How to use social video in your marketing strategy

20th October 2017
Social media trends are constantly changing and it can sometimes feel overwhelming trying to keep up. Video-based advertising is now becoming one of the front-runners of content-strategy, reaching the millennial demographic most effectively due to its less-obvious sales-driven approach. As we become savvier to obvious sales pitches whilst scrolling through our newsfeeds, something that comes across as ‘lifestyle’ marketing, or a conversation between you and a brand can feel more authentic and encourage you to engage. If you do it well, you’ll see higher levels of engagement from your audience. In just 1 month, more video content is uploaded to the web than TV has produced in 30 years. And if that wasn’t enough to blow your mind, Facebook and Snapchat are surpassing 8 billion views a day, whilst YouTube’s 1 billion+ users are watching millions of hours of content daily. So, it seems obvious to say that if your brand isn’t using social video to its advantage, you’re missing a trick. But is social video really worth the hype? I’ll just leave the facts here… Companies that utilise video marketing see 49% faster annual revenue growth for those that don’t 51% of marketing professionals worldwide name video as the type of content with the best ROI 82% of Twitter users watch content on the platform Social video generates 1200% more shares than text and images combined So how should you incorporate social video into your marketing strategy? Decide on content and audience First of all, work out what your primary goal is. Is it to educate? Build brand awareness? Act as a lead gen? Then ask yourself where your audience is – if it’s Facebook, should you create a pre-recorded video that can be shared, or should you post a Facebook Live to create ‘conversation’ with your audience? What about adding captions to the video for those who watch sneakily at work without sound? Setting out these objectives before diving straight to the ‘upload’ button can help you make an informed decision on what kind of video to create. Optimise for the platform Social video is simply video content that can be shared across social media platforms. However, just because a video works well on Facebook, this doesn’t mean it’s going to do the same on say, Instagram, where the time limit is capped at 15 seconds. A large organisation with the budget to match can create refined videos that can be uploaded to YouTube or Facebook. For those with a smaller budget, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat will allow you to connect with your audience quicker and at less of a cost. If your target audience is more present on a certain platform, leverage your content there. If you know your audience spend most of their time on Instagram, don’t post predominately to Facebook. Short is sweet Attention spans and platform restrictions. Should I say any more? Keep your videos short and snappy – Twitter is capped at 30 seconds, Instagram, 15 and Snapchat, 10. If your audience isn’t

Ryanair don’t care

13th October 2017
I recently received a dreaded email. ‘Important Information Regarding Your Ryanair Flight’. Yep, I’d become a victim of the latest Ryanair scandal, my upcoming flights to Lisbon cancelled. As frustrating as this was – and still is, as I battle to get the new, far-more-expensive flights I had to purchase reimbursed – from a PR perspective, it’s been fascinating to receive communications from Ryanair in the wake of this and actually see their PR ‘recovery’ live in action. Ryanair are one of my favourite companies to observe from a comms perspective. They have a bad reputation but they don’t really care. They’re dirt cheap and that’s that. That’s their USP, and if you want all the frills, you can simply pay more elsewhere. No matter how irritated people get by the additional charges they always try to catch you out with, or their flight boarding procedure which for some reason always seems to start after the scheduled flight take-off time, they will still book with Ryanair. I admit there has been many an occasion when I have muttered ‘never again’ after a Ryanair flight, only to be enticed with ‘£9.99 flash sale!’. Michael O’Leary, their CEO, seems to live by his own ‘buy budget, get treated budget’ rule. You have to take your hats off to them. We know what to expect from the Ryanair experience, but shouldn’t good customer service be a standard, regardless of how much we’ve paid? Especially when a disaster such as the flights cancellation fiasco hits. My initial email from Ryanair was pretty standard. I was given two options; I could transfer to the next available Ryanair flight or get a full refund. Both fair enough and what you would expect. The first option probably would have been the easiest, but with accommodation already booked and no Ryanair flights available from an accessible airport on the same dates, it wasn’t to be. So, I went for refund and rebooking with another airline, which ended up costing me twice as much as the original flights. At this point, there had been no information about compensation and reimbursement. As you can imagine, Ryanair’s online chat was offline and their phone line was off the hook, as disgruntled customers everywhere tried to get more info. Big PR fail– a lack of clear information, or deliberately withholding information. It wasn’t until the Civil Aviation Authority came down hard on Ryanair that any information was given about reimbursing costs passengers had incurred as a result of flight cancellations. And it may not come as a surprise that this information didn’t come from Ryanair, but simply from watching the news. Two weeks on, I’ve still received no communication from Ryanair to let me know I’ll be able to claim reimbursement. However, in the meantime, I did receive my favourite email from Ryanair. An apology ‘signed’ by Michael O’Leary which included an £80 voucher for each passenger booked on the cancelled flight – with a heap of terms and conditions of when

Is more more?: Will Twitter’s 280 character limit be a success?

29th September 2017
You might have heard the news this week that Twitter is going to change its character limit from 140 to 280. One of the reasons for this, says the social media giant, is to create language equity. According to Twitter, about 9 percent of tweets are exactly 140 characters, meaning that users frequently have to edit their initial thoughts to get them under the limit or just on.  In languages such as Japanese, Chinese, and Korean, where whole words can be expressed in one character, this isn’t the case. For Twitter, the move is giving those in the west who are affected by “language cramming” the opportunity to use Twitter in a way that doesn’t limit them in expressing themselves. But, to put a 21st spin on Shakespeare, brevity is the soul of Twitter (I know, rich coming from someone who wrote a play 4,042 lines long when the average at the time was 3000). So how will the 280-character limit affect Twitter as a platform?   Why a 280 character limit could be a good thing Twitter has evolved many times to accommodate what users want – which quite often seems to be the capability to say and do more. For example, adding longer videos. When you look at the way people use Twitter, it’s easy to argue that this is a feature that people want – how often have you seen someone use Twitlonger, screenshot a note from their phone or ‘tweetstorm’ (i.e. post a succession of tweets on one topic, usually with (1/5) tagged at the end to show how many tweets there are in the series). Quite simply, 280 characters will allow people to express themselves with fewer limitations. When it comes to marketing, this has some potential to be beneficial – how often have you struggled to fit your key messages into 140 characters? Twitter’s 280 character limit has the potential to help individuals and businesses say what they mean to say, not what they can say within the limitations. It also means that businesses might be able to have more meaningful interactions with their customer base. For example, if a customer complains about something to a business or has a question, a larger character limit will allow them to explain the issue in more detail and give the business more opportunity to respond with a solution or answer beyond “Sorry to hear that – could you DM us your email address?”.   Why a 280 character limit could be the worst thing to happen to Twitter since Donald Trump On the other hand, the short, snappy, nature of Twitter is what makes it so attractive for a multitude of uses. The format is what has made Twitter what it is today – the place to go for breaking news and one of the best mediums for humour ever invented. The essence of Twitter is inevitably wrapped up in the format of its content, and changing a fundamental part of the platform is likely to