• Marketing strategy & planning

    Developing and delivering marketing plans which create Return On Investment

  • Stunning Websites

    Design & build of websites that create business

  • Getting found online

    Increasing awareness and driving traffic to your website

  • Branding

    Logo design, rebranding, corporate identity

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We Are

Digital Glue – marketing, design & web agency
Grabbing attention – online, in print & in person

Services

Branding

Branding

Digital Glue make sure your branding and logo design fits for all mediums: print, online, social media, and anywhere else.
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Copywriting

Copywriting

By understanding customers, Digital Glue create content for our clients which gets their customers taking action.
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Email Marketing

Email Marketing

Email marketing is a cost effective and relevant way of reaching your customers, contacts and prospects. Digital Glue help our clients reach more of them. learn more

Marketing Strategy

Marketing Strategy

Digital Glue help our clients to create clear marketing plans in a number of ways, resulting in improved business.
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Public Relations (PR)

Public Relations (PR)

Digital Glue’s Public Relations clients benefit from an integrated approach; combining old-fashioned basics with a modern approach.
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Print Design

Print Design

Digital Glue’s clients benefit from our team of creative thinkers who together produce professional print and digital designs for effective communication.
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Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

Our SEO services are designed to make sure that we make your website relevant for the people who want information or to buy from your site.
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Social Media Management

Social Media Management

Digital Glue help our clients communicate effectively with their audiences through our social media management.
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Web Design

Web Design

Digital Glue help our clients create websites which present their business in the best possible way and drive their customers to take action.
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Our Work

Learning to Shape Birmingham

Design & Branding / Print Design / Website
 2

The Lease Guide

Design & Branding / Website
 1

X-Rite Video ColorChecker

Marketing / PR
 1

Pathway Group

Copywriting / Social Media
 3

Like what you see?  View our portfolio

From the Blog

Top tips on how to write the perfect press release

23rd September 2016
Your business has news, and you want to share it. But how? These days, there’s a variety of ways businesses share news, whether its announced in a tweet, or detailed in a blog. Both of these are great ways of spreading the word with your existing customers, but how can you go about sharing the news to the wider audience in your industry? The answer is, of course, the press release. Dating way back to 1906, the trusty press release is still an essential way that businesses share news. But your story will only get picked up by journos if it’s right – and getting it right can be tricky. So, we’ve put together some top tips to help you write a perfect press release. Ask yourself “is this news?” Our first tip to write a perfect press release is to make sure your story is newsworthy. This all ties in with your angle. Consider your audience and your industry – is this something that will interest them? Is your business doing something that is new or innovative? Is your news linked to current events? If not, you’re not going to write a perfect press release. Also, remember to consider your industry and the publications you’ll be targeting. A local newspaper will be interested in a different kind of story than an industry specific magazine. Tailor your news to your targets, and your story will get better coverage. Structure This is simple – familiarise yourself with the structure of a press release. Read other press releases online, and make note of the ways they’re structured. To start, make sure you include: A short title followed by a sentence-long summary The main body of your release The word ‘Ends’ or other standard indicator that signals that the content has ended Contact details An about section The inverted triangle A perfect press release is usually based on the inverted triangle format. This means that the important information goes at the top. Make sure that the who, what, where, and when is immediately accessible, so that both journalists and your audience know what the story is about straight away. This will not only help keep the attention of readers, but will also help journalists decide whether the story is worth their time. Content is key When isn’t content key? There are a few things you can do when writing your content to ensure that your release is pitch perfect. For example, where you can, include hard numbers and concrete evidence. An arty and well written summary of your business’ new advancement is all well and good, but without evidence of why it’s significant, it’s just not news. However, remember that it’s not just all about facts – that’s certain to make your press release really boring! Quotes and opinions are just as important. These will help give your business a personal touch and help contribute to the unique angle you’re working towards. It should also go without saying that your release should be

Why do you need brand guidelines?

16th September 2016
What are brand guidelines? All businesses have a brand, whether it’s been consciously constructed or has simply developed over time. Brand guidelines, sometimes called a style guide, are an essential part of an effective marketing strategy. Essentially, a brand guideline is a document that guides employees and designers on how different elements of the business should be used. For example, brand guidelines might suggest how to use the following things: Fonts – including the look and sizes of headers and body text Logos – including the right colours, the right sizes, the right alternative logos etc. Colour palletes – what specific colours should be used in online and print material Approved images Tone of voice and stylistic guidelines Creating a set of brand guidelines is a very exciting but time-consuming project for a designer, because it requires an incredible amount of thought and a comprehensive understanding of the business. However, there are several reasons why going to the effort of creating a set of brand guidelines is worth it. So why do you need brand guidelines? Why do you need brand guidelines? They help create a strong brand identity One of the reasons you need brand guidelines is that they help create a strong brand identity. Consistency is key. Constructing an identity, no matter what it is, is much easier when you have a set of guidelines to help you maintain a coherent image. Strong and consistent branding helps clarify what your business stands for, allowing your business to communicate your purpose, your personality, and your promises. For example, a law firm or a higher education institute might have more stringent rules about how they use tone of voice on social media than a restaurant or a creative agency. A consistent tone of voice, and a consistent brand identity, helps keep a business on-message. Which leads us to our next point… They help maintain an image of professionalism As we mentioned, a law firm might want to consistently use a particular tone of voice, perhaps one that is sincere, informed, but also friendly – text talk and cheeky jokes probably aren’t appropriate. This will help maintain an image of professionalism. However, it’s not just tone of voice which suggests professionalism. Things such as consistent colours and logos across your businesses online and offline will help too. For example, if your logo differs on Twitter from your website, or even between your Facebook profile picture and your cover photo, customers might get confused or even apprehensive about using your business. Basically, inconsistent branding simply doesn’t look good. One of the reasons businesses need brand guidelines is that they ensure impressions of competence and professionalism across the brand. They aid brand recognition This is the most obvious reason why businesses need brand guidelines. The consistency that guidelines create means that brands are instantly recognisable to customers, without having to introduce who you are and what you do. Consider Google, for example. When you see those four colours, you know exactly who you’re dealing

Digital Glue’s PR Tools Glossary

8th September 2016
As PR experts, we have to constantly be on the ball with the latest media trends. We use a number of tools to help us research, collaborate, and save time in a fast-moving environment. Here’s a list of some of the PR tools we use. Keep checking back for updates as we discover more! Answer The Client “Google Analytics for your PR coverage.” It’s simple – connect  your Google Analytics account, paste in your coverage URLs, and this free tool will create the data to help simply demonstrate what traffic your coverage sent to a specific website. Answer The Public “Consumer insight for PR in the Age of Google.” Answer the Public is a tool to help you understand the questions people have about a certain topic. You can use it to search for questions related to a keyword, find out which questions people are asking from Google, and filter by country, popularity, type of question or preposition. It’s really useful when tailoring content around a specific subject that you may not be too familiar with. And it’s FREE! Buzzsumo BuzzSumo helps you discover content that your audience wants to engage with and identifies influencers to reach out to. Packages start at $99/month, but it’s a useful tool for finding out what sort of articles media think are worthwhile. Coverage Book One of our favourite PR tools from the ‘Answer The…’ team. Coverage Book is simple to use and affordable. You can set up all your PR clients on your account and create ‘coverage books’ for each. Simply copy and paste links in for online clippings, and add PDFs/images for offline clippings. Coverage Book turns your coverage into a presentable piece you can share with your clients. Followerwonk Followerwonk can be used in a number of ways, but for PR, its most useful feature is the find function. You can search keywords to find key influencers who would be interested in your client, and filter by location. Try it for free with a Twitter account. Mustr It can be difficult to keep track of who in your team has spoke with which journalist, which can result in journalists being contacted multiple times about the same thing by different people. Mustr claims to help you and your team to organise your network of journalists and bloggers. You can send press releases directly from it, add notes about journalists, and share contacts amongst your team. Rapportive Rapportive is a free Chrome add-on from LinkedIn. Once you open an email in Gmail when you’ve installed Rapportive, you’ll see the sender’s LinkedIn profile on your sidebar. This is great for connecting with people and seeing where they’re based so you can arrange to meet up. Share Count Share Count is a simple, free tool which does what it says on the tin. Simply stick the URL of your coverage into Share Count and it will analyse where and how many times it’s been shared online. Share Tally Like the above, but more detailed. We’d recommend Tally over Count.

Choosing the right social media platform for your business part 2: Snapchat vs Instagram

2nd September 2016
Last month, we looked at what questions you should ask yourself when choosing the right social media platform for your business.  In this blog we’ll be tackling two social media giants who have very recently gone head-to-head in a bid to win your business. That’s right – it’s Snapchat vs Instagram. We’ve written blogs on using Instagram and Snapchat for business before, but the world of social media is ever-changing. Just last month, Instagram launched ‘Instagram Stories’ – a suspiciously Snapchat story-esque feature which lets users share pictures and videos for 24 hours only. So, as the Snapchat vs Instagram war wages on, we’ve decided to revisit both apps and look at 3 key questions businesses should be asking themselves to make sure they choose the right social media platform for their business.   How do audiences engage with brands on Snapchat and Instagram? Earlier this year, Instagram reported having 500 million users, with more than 300 million using the app daily. Snapchat reported a lower number of 150 million daily users, but the number of people on Snapchat is rapidly growing – Business Insider reports that the app is on pace for 217 million users by end of 2017. But it’s not all about where the most people are, but where the right people are, and how to engage with them. In the Snapchat vs Instagram knockout, businesses need to think carefully about targeting the right people, and how they’re going to be engaging with your brand. According to BrandWatch,  90% of the world’s top 100 brands have an Instagram account, and engagement with brands is 10x higher than on Facebook, and 84x higher than on Twitter. Why? The simplicity of Instagram makes it easy to comment and like on posts – all it takes is a double tap. Engagement is arguably a trickier metric to measure on Snapchat – there are no likes and comments, and users are unlikely to reply to a brand’s snap. However, you can measure engagement through total unique views, how many people watched through your entire story, or even screenshots taken. Snapchat makes up for its smaller size in its ability to engage audiences – Business Insider reported earlier this year that users spend 25 to 30 minutes on the app every day, and that almost 25% of all U.S. Snapchat users spend an equal amount of time messaging friends as they do following brands and watching media content through Discover and Live Stories. For example, Gatorade’s Super Bowl Snapchat filter got 160 million views – way more than the 115 million who watched the game. So when considering Snapchat vs Instagram as your main social platform, it might be worth considering whether it suits your aims to reach out to more people, or to engage more directly with your existing audience. What kind of content do you want to share and how do you want to share it? Chances are, if you’re debating over Snapchat vs Instagram for your business, image and video